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Difference between revisions of "EPC Modelling Function"


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The modelling of a function succeeds either a start event or a conventional event. Figure 4 visualises the steps that are necessary to model an EPC function.
 
The modelling of a function succeeds either a start event or a conventional event. Figure 4 visualises the steps that are necessary to model an EPC function.
 
Since the modelling of a function succeeds an event, there are only two possible options: The user can either model a single succeeding function or multiple functions that are split via an AND operator, since EPC rules only allow parallel splits after an event (Keller et al., 1992). In the first case, the single function has to be modelled and labelled accordingly. In the second case, the user needs to model the operator first. Afterwards, two scenarios might occur for every function the modeller has identified. In the first case, the textual description of the process refers to a new function, which then has to be modelled and labelled. In the second case, the de-scription refers to a function already included in the model. Here, the modeller needs to connect the process flow by inserting a new XOR operator (Join) preceding the existing function to fulfil EPC syntax restrictions. At the end of the function modelling phase, there is a check for re-sources. If the description indicates potential resource consumption, the resource phase is triggered. Otherwise, the function phase follows.
 
Since the modelling of a function succeeds an event, there are only two possible options: The user can either model a single succeeding function or multiple functions that are split via an AND operator, since EPC rules only allow parallel splits after an event (Keller et al., 1992). In the first case, the single function has to be modelled and labelled accordingly. In the second case, the user needs to model the operator first. Afterwards, two scenarios might occur for every function the modeller has identified. In the first case, the textual description of the process refers to a new function, which then has to be modelled and labelled. In the second case, the de-scription refers to a function already included in the model. Here, the modeller needs to connect the process flow by inserting a new XOR operator (Join) preceding the existing function to fulfil EPC syntax restrictions. At the end of the function modelling phase, there is a check for re-sources. If the description indicates potential resource consumption, the resource phase is triggered. Otherwise, the function phase follows.
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[[File:EPC Modelling function.jpg|frameless|center]]
 
[[File:EPC Modelling function.jpg|frameless|center]]
''Figure 3.  EPC function''
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''Figure 4.  EPC function''
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== References ==
 
== References ==
 
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<div class="toccolours mw-collapsible mw-collapsed">

Revision as of 12:58, 12 September 2017

Short description

The modelling of a function succeeds either a start event or a conventional event. Figure 4 visualises the steps that are necessary to model an EPC function. Since the modelling of a function succeeds an event, there are only two possible options: The user can either model a single succeeding function or multiple functions that are split via an AND operator, since EPC rules only allow parallel splits after an event (Keller et al., 1992). In the first case, the single function has to be modelled and labelled accordingly. In the second case, the user needs to model the operator first. Afterwards, two scenarios might occur for every function the modeller has identified. In the first case, the textual description of the process refers to a new function, which then has to be modelled and labelled. In the second case, the de-scription refers to a function already included in the model. Here, the modeller needs to connect the process flow by inserting a new XOR operator (Join) preceding the existing function to fulfil EPC syntax restrictions. At the end of the function modelling phase, there is a check for re-sources. If the description indicates potential resource consumption, the resource phase is triggered. Otherwise, the function phase follows.

EPC Modelling function.jpg

Figure 4. EPC function

References


  • [1] Jannaber, S., Riehle, D., Delfmann, P., & Thomas, O. (2017). HELP IS ON THE WAY–PROVIDING USER SUPPORT FOR EPC MODELLING VIA A SYSTEMATIC PROCEDURE MODEL.
  • [2] Keller, G., Nüttgens, M. and Scheer, A.-W. (1992), “Semantische Prozeßmodellierung auf der Grundlage ‘Ereignisgesteuerter Prozeßketten (EPK)’”, Universität des Saarlandes.